Acme Oyster House – Shucking Since 1910

In the heart of the French Quarter of New Orleans you can find Acme Oyster House. Originally the Acme Café opened on Royal Street in 1910 where is stood until 1924 when a fire destroyed the restaurant. They reopened at 724 Iberville Street under their new name Acme Oyster House and have been shucking oysters ever since. Currently they have six locations in the United States. However if you are in the French Quarter this is a stop you must make.

Walking through the French Quarter in the sun, a sudden urge came over me and it was time to “Feed The Beast”! Whenever in NOLA it is a must that I get oysters. What better place to go, then to the place that is famous for them?

Looking for a quick snack we headed over to Acme Oyster House. Places that sell oysters are in abundance, yet there is a reason there is always a line to get in at this joint. If you know the right people and have connections, you just may be fortunate enough to get your hands on a “Head of the line” card. This card will entitle you to skip the wait and get to the front of the line and seated right away. Fortunate for “The Beast” we were going to sit at the bar and didn’t have to wait since seats just opened upon our arrival.

Acme Oyster House has a full bar, wine list and several beers on tap. We needed something cold so we ordered the Abita Blonde. Abita is a brewery located in Louisiana. I’ve had every type of beer they make over the years, but the blonde is the perfect compliment to eating oysters. I always say, “When away, drink local”.

Even though we were there for oysters, they have a full menu that consists of everything from gumbos, alligator, fried seafood platters, sandwiches, Po-Boys and more. If you are unfamiliar with what a Po-Boy is, fret not. We will be covering that in an upcoming blog. Acme Oyster House has a variety of Po-Boys but are famous for a couple of items on their menu. Clearly raw oysters is on the top of the list. Alongside that is their Chargrilled oysters. However, if you are looking for something with more substance, their “Acme 10 Napkin Roast Beef” is a sandwich you will not soon forget.

As I said earlier we were there just to get out of the sun, have a snack and pay homage to this legendary oyster house. With that we ordered raw oysters and chargrilled oysters. In one of my previous blogs, I made my chargrilled oysters that was inspired by Acme Oyster House. This is a dish that is so good that every oyster lover should experience. They shuck fresh oysters and top them with an herb butter sauce, a blend of cheese and chargrill them. They arrive sizzling hot with some bread to dunk in the juice. This dish brings oysters to a completely different level.

The locals I know in New Orleans constantly debate who has the best chargrilled oysters. I’ve tried the others and sure they are good. However, Acme has sentimental value to this old soul. I’ve been going here for over fifteen years where I enjoyed my time with people I truly love in the world. There is something very special for me when I walk through their doors.

There is one other reason why I keep going to Acme Oyster House. Each time I go, I am determined to try and get my name in Acme history. It is called the “15 Dozen Club”. To be in the club you must order and eat a minimum of fifteen dozen raw oysters in one seating. Many have tried and many have failed. Each visit I do some additional research on the strategy needed to rise above the rest. Stay tuned for my next visit, because “The Beast” will be ready!

Until then, if you are in the French Quarter of New Orleans stop in and grab a cold beer and enjoy some grub.

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